30
Jan

Implementing AODA Compliance for Web & Mobile Applications

Part of the Ontarian set of laws intended to improve accessibility for people with disabilities, the AODA – Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act adopted back in 2005 is intended to implement and enforce accessibility standards for Ontarians with disabilities with respect to everyday life aspects like goods, services, employment, accommodation, healthcare, facilities, transport and more kh0csxv.

The act eliminates what is called a barrier in terms of technology, information, communication and more for people with mental or physical disabilities. The Act is a major step forward in the history of fighting against discrimination of persons with disabilities in Ontario, therefore supported by individuals, as well as by government entities and companies alike.

The AODA sets of rules and standards concern the internet perhaps more than anything else. Ontario based websites need to comply with these regulations or are susceptible to penalties that can even escalate to lawsuits. The Act clearly specifies that government entities, public sector organizations, enterprises and related businesses must align their websites and web applications with the World Wide Web Consortium Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, intended to make website browsing and content access easily available to people with different levels of disabilities, from cognitive limitations to physical impairment.

AODA complaint websites will become the standard in the upcoming years, as the Act’s rules and regulations must be fully adopted and implemented by 2025, as stipulated by the law. However, implementing the necessary accessibility features requires both analysis and development to ensure correct design and functionality and a win-win outcome for visitors and users as well as for website and web apps operators and owners.

 

The most common implementation of the AODA compliance for web projects is based on the technical standard WCAG 2.0 levels:

  • Level A (lowest), which implies a logical app/site structure, audio control, keyboard access, text alternative for non-text content, responsible use of colors, video and audio captions and more
  • Level AA (intermediate), which implies live captions, audio alternative to text, text resizing options, sensitive data secured management, pre-set contrast ratio, use of clear and accessible icons, links and buttons, and more
  • Level AAA (advanced), which implies translations, media alternatives, intuitive visual layout, keyboard accessibility, location and geo-location services, optimal readability level, help and instruction regarding site browsing and functionality and more

 

At VerticalWave Solutions we support the AODA and work close with our clients to implement intuitive and correct accessibility features across all the websites, apps and platforms we develop. This is a complex process, starting with website/app/project audit and continuing with responsible research and development to reach the end goal. Our Drupal projects integrate modern UI and UX with intuitive accessibility features. A close focus on design and functionality on both mobile and desktop platforms ensures a successful project delivery and seamless integration with the AODA rules and regulations.

Text resizing, text to speech, full featured content, accurate search, responsive and adaptive design, mobile friendly interface, quick access buttons, media integration, intuitive menus are just a few of the required accessibility features we successfully implemented for important clients like The C.D. Howe Institute, GREO – Gambling Research Exchange Ontario, YouthREX, <a href="https://verticalhq find more info.ca/portfolio_item/the-homeless-hub”>The Homeless Hub and more.  All of our clients’ websites and apps are fully comply with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act as required for an optimal web experience.

13
Aug

The Homeless Hub and Canadian Housing First Toolkit Launched

The Homeless Hub is a web-based research library and information center, a platform which offers information about homelessness from across Canada. It provides easy access to information for services providers, researchers, government representatives, students, and readers and it hosts a large number of contributors to its information database.

By using the powerful features of the Drupal CMS, VerticalWave put the latest technology to good use in order to enhance knowledge mobilization and networking. Homeless Hub represents a new interactive platform, which provides users with simplified and fast access to information. Users now can easy access and share the wealth of information on homelessness.

The Homeless Hub also features an advanced and highly efficient search engine based on the powerful Apache Solr, which allows users to search for all the Hubs content such as: reports, papers, e-books, summaries, studies, multimedia and more. The Hub is also integrated with all the large social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIN, etc. and it features a user-friendly blog section.

The Canadian Housing First Toolkit is a complementary resource site for the Homeless Hub funded by The Mental Health Commission of Canada. The Housing First Toolkit represents an informational hub and resource site which helps Canadians get more involved in the housing aspect of homelessness.This website main’s audience are the doctors, planners, government-policy makers, researchers, as well as general audience.

Just like in the case of the Homeless Hub, the information and resources of this site are easy to manage by the editorial team using the custom back-end Drupal administration interface. The Canadian Housing First Toolkit is also available in French.

VerticalWave is proud to be a part of the team behind the Homeless Hub and Canadian Housing First Toolkit projects and help with such a pressing and yet misunderstood social issue like homelessness.